Friends of the Smokies at Purchase Knob

Fall Trail

The weather forecast was not encouraging today.

However over twenty Friends of the Smokies members ignored the threat of rain and even thunderstorms and went hiking at Purchase Knob.

It would be more correct to say  we hiked from Purchase Knob, home of the  Appalachian Highland Science Learning Center in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Beth R. of Tampa led the group.

The day started out gray but the yellows, reds, green and even brown more than made up for the lack of brilliant sunshine.

We left the Science Center on the Cataloochee Divide Trail, which is the dividing line between the park on one side and private land on the other.

Bill Woody’s cabin

First we stopped to admire the view from Bill Woody’s cabin. If you look to the left of the cabin, you see the private road that allows the owner to get from his house to this tiny cabin.

Gooseberry Knob, at the Swag Resort, allowed us to feel like we were staying at this high-end luxurious mountain hotel.

Since the trail passes by the property, the owners, Deener and Dan Matthews, encourages hikers to stop and sit a while. And we did. See the picture at the top of this post.

Then the climb started to Hemphill Bald located at Cataloochee Ranch, a private dude  ranch. The ranch is managed by the third generation of Alexanders.

To their credit, the owners have protected the property with a conservation easement. Though they can graze cattle and ride horses on the property, they can’t have developers put houses and condos on these high mountain knobs.

Marker trees

We came back down and took a short detour to a Native American Trail Marker Tree. The Cherokees bent back saplings to grow with a curve to indicate a trail marker – like our trail blazes but without the paint.

Here are Jack and Linda under the Trail Marker Tree.

By now, no one knows what “trail” the tree was supposed to mark.

After we returned to Purchase Knob, Ranger Paul Super gave us a short history of the Learning Center and its purpose. You can read more about the Learning Centers here.

Thanks, Beth, for leading the hike.

The next Friends of the Smokies hike will be on Tuesday, November 14 on the North Shore Road Loop. Sign up here.

Apostrophes and Periods!

I recently went to a North Carolina Writers Network meeting in Asheville. Nina Hart, Writing from the Top of your Head, was the speaker. She’s a writing and creativity coach, who help people become fearless writers.

Because I write about the outdoors, I don’t have writer’s block. I start with facts, try to make them interesting and relevant, but I can always rely on facts.

The writing exercise was: Write the worst that you can. What??

Since I didn’t know what that meant, I wrote the first thing that came to my head about writing badly: I judge people by their use of apostrophes.

I could go on about the “IT’S” and ITS problem but I’m an outdoor writer.

Poster campaign at OVC

Clingmans Dome

I try to let people know gently that there’s no apostrophe in Clingmans Dome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Since 1890, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names has been the official arbiter of American place names. This board decided from the very beginning to not use apostrophes. So Clingmans Dome and other place names usually don’t use the possessive form.

Some say that cartographers feared that these punctuation marks could be mistaken for topographic features or symbols. Leaving out the apostrophe reduces the amount of printed type on a map.

Another reason might be that apostrophes suggest possession or associations not meant to be used within the body of a proper name. The idea is that geographic names belong to all of us. Owning a piece of land is not in itself a reason to name it after the landlord.

Another blog quotes Jennifer Runyon, a senior researcher for the board.

“It’s ingrained in us from the first day on the job that geographic names belong to all the people,” she said. “The feeling is that owners come and go, but names are supposed to stand the test of time.”

Gene Espy, 2nd A.T. Thru-Hiker

Appalachian Trail – A.T.

Then there are the periods in A.T. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, which manages the Appalachian Trail, uses periods and that’s the right way. They get to say how to abbreviate their trail.

For completeness, Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail uses MST, without periods. That’s good enough for me.

I’m not a Grammar Vigilante. I don’t try to sneak around fixing grammar on public boards. I just stick to outdoor names.

What you can learn from “writing badly”.

Illustrated Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park – Book review

What can you say that’s new about the most visited park in the country, Great Smoky Mountains National Park? Maybe not much, but you can surely present it in a different, novel way.

Illustrated Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park by Daniel S. Pierce, Joel Anderson and Nathan Anderson is a beautiful coffee table which tells of the wonder, beauty of the park without forsaking its history. In less than 130 pages, the book depicts each section of the park along with a full-page poster-like painting.

The introduction shows a timeline of human activity in the Smokies area.

In 1000 CE, the first settlement of Kituah became the Mother Town of the Cherokee. European settlers moved into the Oconaluftee section of the park in 1802. The book is as recent as the devastating fires during in the fall of 2016.

At LeConte Lodge

After reading the introduction, I turned to the pages on LeConte Lodge, the highest guest lodge in the eastern United States, to read about its origins. In my experience, it’s the most deluxe high-mountain lodge – ever. You can stay at 6,360 feet and not have to carry a sleeping bag. That’s luxury!

Dan Pierce is now Professor of History and National Endowment of the Humanities Distinguished Professor at UNCA and former chair of the history department.

When I came to Asheville in 2001, I enrolled in a course Intro to the Southern Appalachians at the College for Seniors in Asheville. Dan was the instructor. His first book, The Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat to National Park had just come out. I read it eagerly and recommended it to other as THE book on the park. So, he is the certainly the right person to write the copy for this illustrated guide to the Smokies.

You can’t discuss this book without mentioning the Anderson Design Group. They created the drawings of waterfalls, cabins, views and picnic areas in the classic poster art styles from the 1920s to 1940s. The back page of the book shows posters of the 59 national parks, which they gathered into a book. I counted all the national parks that I’ve been to – 40 over the years.
The details
You can buy the paperback book on the Great Smoky Mountains Association website  for $24.95.

A hardback copy is available at the Anderson Design Group website,  for $39.99.

Think Christmas – Your shopping all done

Book Launch
The three authors will be speaking about the book on October 5 at 6:30pm in the University of North Carolina – Asheville Humanities Lecture Hall. After the presentation, they’ll move to the Ramsey Library’s Blowers Gallery for a reception to open the exhibit of art work from the book. The exhibit will be up until the end of November.